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Peak Water

Written by , on June 5, 2013

The US Geological Survey has released a report highlighting the alarming rate of groundwater depletion in the United States. The report says that between 1900 and 2008, the US lost 1,000 cubic kilometers of water from its 40 major aquifers – that's an average rate of 9.2 cubic kilometres a year. Even more alarming is […]  Read more »

New Nanotechnology to Clean Polluted Water

Written by , on May 9, 2013

Scientists from Australia's Deakin University, together with French colleagues, say that they have manufactured a lightweight and reusable material that can absorb up to 33 times its weight in a wide range of spilt oils, chemical solvents and dyes, while repelling water. Deakin University's Dr Wei Wei Lei said that "The effective removal of oils, organic […]  Read more »

Food Footsteps from a Rooftop Greenhouse

Written by , on April 17, 2013

Green walls and roof gardens have become extremely fashionable. One New York supermarket is taking the idea two steps further. Rather than just plant any greenery on the roof, Whole Foods is partnering with Gotham Greens to construct an 1,860 square metre greenhouse on its roof. As well as the usual benefits of a green […]  Read more »

Sahara Forest Project Progress

Written by , on April 13, 2013

Back in 2008, we wrote about the Sahara Forest Project – a plan to use solar power and seawater desalination to produce renewable energy, food and water in an area of desert. As shown in this video, the first fully operational pilot plant has now been built.  A documentary about the people and progress of […]  Read more »

Desalination Process Uses Cuts Energy Needed by 99%

Written by , on March 23, 2013

Engineers at Lockheed Martin Corp say that they have developed a desalination process which requires just 1% of the energy needed in the best systems currently available. The process enables the engineers to produce thin graphene carbon membranes with regular holes about a nanometer in diameter. These holes are large enough to allow water to […]  Read more »

Reversing Desertification with Holistic Farming

Written by , on March 8, 2013

Large areas of grasslands in the United States, Canada, Mexico, China, Australia, Africa, Pakistan, Afghanistan and many other countries are turning into barren deserts. An estimated one-third of the Earth’s surface is covered with grasslands that are facing the threat of desertification.  Allan Savory, a Zimbabwean biologist who has been working on this problem since […]  Read more »

A Billboard That Produces Drinking Water

Written by , on February 25, 2013

Peru's capital, Lima, has very high humidity but hardly any rain. Engineers from the University of Engineering and Technology have taken advantage of the high humidity to build a billboard which gathers the water through reverse osmosis and purifies it to give clean drinking water.  Read more »

Rice Yields Being Doubled in Developing Countries

Written by , on February 19, 2013

Using a technique deriving from work started in the 1960s by a French priest, Henri de Laulanié, in Madagascar, farmers in many developing countries have increased their paddy field rice yields by 50 to 100% – and often much more. The worldwide average rice yield is about 4 tonnes per hectare. Using modern fertilizers and […]  Read more »

The Hidden Cost of Hamburgers

Written by , on February 15, 2013

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“Food is the new oil”, Lester Brown

Written by , on February 13, 2013

Lester Brown, founder of the Worldwatch Institute, and founder and president of the Earth Policy Institute, discusses the global struggle for food security, which is the subject of his latest book "Full Planet, Empty Plates".  Read more »